[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.22″][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.25″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.25″ custom_padding=”|||” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.9.1″ _module_preset=”default”]

Anna Kennedy needs you to complete this very important survey: Who will look after my sons when I am no longer around?
Click here to sign and show your support.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.9.2″ header_text_color=”#8300E9″ header_2_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_3_text_align=”center” header_3_text_color=”#8300E9″ header_4_text_color=”#8300e9″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ animation_style=”zoom” z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

Who will be there for you when I am gone?
An article by Deborah Azagury-Slattery
Mother to Jack Azagury-Slattery our young charity Patron

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”4.9.2″ vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ hover_enabled=”0″ z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” sticky_enabled=”0″]

From the moment we have children the only thing we can think about is how to raise them properly, protect them and make sure that they are ready for adulthood, ready for a life outside the cocoon of the family home and to make sure that they have the best set up to live a happy and meaningful independent life.

When jack was very young and we found out that he was autistic and most likely would never be able to have a fully independent life like others could, we knew that we would have to somehow prepare for so much more.

Every day my husband and I ask ourselves the same questions, how is Jack going to develop? Where is the best place for him going to be? The best school? Who is going to always look out for him and protect him when we are not next to him doing that for him?

We often turn to our youngest son David and think of the big responsibility that might fall on his shoulders when he is older and has a family of his own and we are no longer around.

It is fair to expect that of him? How do we prepare him for that without burdening him? So many questions …..

We spend our days thinking of ways we can help Jack, secure a future for him when we are not around and making sure that there will be someone out there who will love him, understand him and care for him as much as we do, but there isn’t because we are his parents and nobody will love him as much as we do apart from our family and we cannot guarantee that they will be able to look after him when he is older.

Again, would or should we burden them with such a responsibility?

We can try and plan financially, we can try and plan all the logistics, but the reality is that at one point we will not be able to plan for any of the “what ifs”.

What would be reassuring to us is securing Jack’s future in a place where we know he will always get support and that does not exist. We have just managed to secure a Secondary school, one that we think will be best suited to him and his needs but again how can we be sure? So, we try our best and will look for the support where we can find it.

So, for now we are set until he is 19, we hope, but then what is next? What will happen to Jack? Where will he go? Most likely many things will happen between now and then that are completely out of our control and our job is to try and make sure that Jack is looked after in every way.

We are luckier than most, we have an amazing family support unit who loves Jack and understand him and who gets us through every hurdles! And there have been so many so far, so much bureaucracy, so many rejections, so much to fight against within the system! I see it every day, parents and carers who just cannot fight against such a machine and do not have the support we have. It should not be this hard!

Many are single parents with no help and no way of planning! This has to stop! There is a real need for additional support for children like Jack who are coming-of-age, needing to learn to be independent, needing to find a purpose in our society, needing to be understood and not judged and needing to be cared for.

But at the moment I don’t think enough is being done and it’s our duty, all of us, to make that happen.

Thanks to charities like “Anna Kennedy Online” and so many other organisations, a lot has already been achieved to make sure that our society understands Autistic people a little better and so much research has already gone into the condition and for that we are eternally grateful. But it is just the start.

Despite so many battles already fought, so far Jack has been very fortunate to be in a wonderful and inclusive Primary school and he is growing up happy, safe and surrounded with love, but we worry for his future.

How do we keep him happy, safe, understood and loved when we are no longer here? Who do we turn to? Who do we entrust that responsibility to for all the years to come? The questions never end ….. more needs to be available for children and adults with Special Needs.

by Deborah Azagury-Slattery, mother to Jack Azagury-Slattery our Young Charity Patron

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *