[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”4.16″ global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”4.16″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”4.16″ custom_padding=”|||” global_colors_info=”{}” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.17.3″ header_text_align=”center” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ header_2_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_3_text_align=”center” header_3_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_4_text_color=”#8300e9″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ module_alignment=”center” animation_style=”slide” z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” global_colors_info=”{}”]

Mental health awareness week – an article by Paul Isaacs 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.21.0″ _module_preset=”default” hover_enabled=”0″ global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

Mechanisms Of Mental Health

Mental health is something that can and does change over time, the world moves on regardless and so do you.

Sometimes this is not the internal feeling however this can be influenced by many different, nuanced, person centred and often inter linking factors.

  • Core beliefs (warped worldviews vs. connected authentic outlooks)
  • Self-Reflection (the ability to manage your own selfhood)
  • Information Processing (the way in which the brain filters information)
  • Nervous System Responses (many mental health conditions mean the nervous system is overused)
  • Emotional Regulation (the ability to recognise, filter and mange yours and others emotional frequencies)
  • Environment (caregiving, educational & community)
  • Attachment, Friendship & Relationship Dynamics (poor boundaries, emotional incest, projection & manipulative behaviours)

Everything Is Linked 

These factors (in various guises, degrees, and presentations) will have an impact on someone’s idea of “self”, personal expectations vs. connected one’s, perception of danger and threat, how one internalises their own emotions and healthy spaces for expressing and objective reasoning, boundaries, and healthy modelling of friendships and relationships.

Paul Isaacs 2023

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”4.16″ global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”4.16″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”4.16″ custom_padding=”|||” global_colors_info=”{}” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.19.2″ _module_preset=”default” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ animation_style=”slide” hover_enabled=”0″ global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

Sean Kennedy presents: EHC Needs Assessments

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.19.2″ _module_preset=”default” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ hover_enabled=”0″ global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

Sean Kennedy presents: EHC Needs Assessments

The test that is applied once an EHC needs assessment is completed
How relevant case law can assist when applying the test
Things to consider when writing a parental contribution

This seminar will look at the test that is applied once an EHC needs assessment is completed and this will be done alongside a review of the relevant caselaw. All of this information will be used when considering what a parental contribution should look like.

This will take place on Tuesday 10th Jan at 7.30 PM.
Click here to book your place

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”4.16″ global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”4.16″ _module_preset=”default” locked=”off” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”4.16″ _module_preset=”default” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.19.0″ _module_preset=”default” header_text_align=”center” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ animation_style=”fade” hover_enabled=”0″ global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

Tips for Understanding Your Classmates with Autism

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.19.0″ _module_preset=”default” hover_enabled=”0″ global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

When you go to school, you will notice that everyone is different. Sometimes, these differences make it hard to talk to a classmate. Autism is one reason that one in about every 44 students you see each day is not exactly like everyone else. To help, the Autism Hero Awards explains more about what autism is and how to be a good friend to classmates who have this diagnosis.

What Is Autism?

Autism is something that can affect a person’s ability to communicate. Someone with autism might have trouble looking you in the eyes when they talk. Sometimes, they might not talk at all. Some children who have autism might flap their hands around or rock in their chairs, and this can be scary to other kids. But you should know that their behavior is not without reason. Kids with autism can be overwhelmed by the things happening around them. Lights might feel too bright and sounds might be too loud. The rocking, shaking, or tapping — sometimes even yelling or crying — is how they cope with too much input coming into their senses.

One way to understand how they might feel is to think back to a time when your mom or dad turned your light on while you were still asleep. When you opened your eyes, the light was probably uncomfortable. Your first reaction might have been to cover your head, close your eyes tightly, and put your hands over your face. Children with autism might feel this way all the time, and they try to fight these feelings by moving repetitively. It is interesting to note that the same reflex that makes your eyes hurt has been studied as a way to diagnose autism in children.

How Can Parents Help?

There are a lot of ways children with autism can get help from their parents. First, parents will let their teachers know that their child has autism. At home, they might do things like keep their house quiet and avoid painting the walls really bright colors that could hurt the child’s eyes and make it hard to concentrate. Parents often focus on making their homes as stress-free and relaxing as possible for their autistic children. Even simple things like getting rid of clutter or adding greenery (plants and flowers) can make a place far more inviting and comfortable for children with ASD.

Children with autism sometimes have trouble sleeping in their own beds or can’t sleep at all. When this happens, their parents might look for ways to make them comfortable in their bedroom so that they can rest. Children who don’t get enough sleep can be really cranky!

Getting to Know a Child with Autism

If you go to school with a child who has autism, take the time to get to know him or her. You might find that he or she is really interesting. In fact, children with autism or Asperger’s, which is a former term for a level of autism, have a lot in common with geniuses, and are sometimes better able to remember details about things better than everybody else. Don’t be afraid to talk to your classmates, even if they don’t talk like everybody else. It’s easy to misunderstand someone you don’t know. Try to remember that, to them, you are the one who’s different.

The National Autistic Society has a lot of great information about autism, and your own parents and school counselor can help you learn even more. There are even TV shows with characters who have autism. Ask your parents if you can watch an episode; it’s a fun way to learn something new about a misunderstood condition.

Remember, no two people are the same. It is our differences that make us unique. Just like you might be taller – or shorter – than everyone else, someone with autism has their own set of characteristics that makes them the person they are. And if you’re patient, you might be able to get to know that person and make a new friend.

The Autism Hero Awards proudly acknowledges and celebrates people and their accomplishments in the world of Autism. Learn more by exploring our site.

Image via Pixabay

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”4.16″ global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”4.16″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”4.16″ custom_padding=”|||” global_colors_info=”{}” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.19.0″ _module_preset=”default” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ animation_style=”slide” global_colors_info=”{}”]

Breaking down the EHC needs assessment

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.19.0″ _module_preset=”default” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ global_colors_info=”{}”]

Sean Kennedy presents: Breaking down the EHC needs assessment including what evidence is required and what test and other factors should be applied when a local authority makes a decision.

This will take place on Tuesday 6th December 2022 at 19:30

Click here to book your place

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”4.16″ global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”4.16″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”4.16″ custom_padding=”|||” global_colors_info=”{}” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.18.0″ _module_preset=”default” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ animation_style=”slide” global_colors_info=”{}”]

An introduction to SEND and EHCp

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.18.0″ _module_preset=”default” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ global_colors_info=”{}”]

This online session looks at how to identify special educational needs and how to apply for an EHCp. Although aimed at beginners, it is likely to be useful to more experienced parents, young person and teachers.

This will be hosted by Sean Kennedy Barrister and will take place on Wednesday 2nd November 2022 at 7.30pm.

Click here to book your place 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”4.16″ global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”4.16″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”4.16″ custom_padding=”|||” global_colors_info=”{}” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.17.3″ header_text_align=”center” header_text_color=”#8300E9″ header_2_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_3_text_align=”center” header_3_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_4_text_color=”#8300e9″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ module_alignment=”center” animation_style=”slide” z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” global_colors_info=”{}”]

Mental health awareness week – an article by Paul Isaacs 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.17.3″ _module_preset=”default” global_colors_info=”{}”]

Mechanisms Of Mental Health

Mental health is something that can and does change over time, the world moves on regardless and so do you.

Sometimes this is not the internal feeling however this can be influenced by many different, nuanced, person centred and often inter linking factors.

  • Core beliefs (warped worldviews vs. connected authentic outlooks) 
  • Self-Reflection (the ability to manage your own selfhood) 
  • Information Processing (the way in which the brain filters information)
  • Nervous System Responses (many mental health conditions mean the nervous system is overused) 
  • Emotional Regulation (the ability to recognise, filter and mange yours and others emotional frequencies)
  • Environment (caregiving, educational & community)
  • Attachment, Friendship & Relationship Dynamics (poor boundaries, emotional incest, projection & manipulative behaviours)

Everything Is Linked 

These factors (in various guises, degrees, and presentations) will have an impact on someone’s idea of “self”, personal expectations vs. connected one’s, perception of danger and threat, how one internalises their own emotions and healthy spaces for expressing and objective reasoning, boundaries, and healthy modelling of friendships and relationships.

Paul Isaacs 2022 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.22″ global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.25″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” global_colors_info=”{}”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.25″ custom_padding=”|||” global_colors_info=”{}” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.14.5″ header_text_color=”#8300e9″ header_2_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_3_text_align=”center” header_3_text_color=”#0c71c3″ header_4_text_color=”#8300e9″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ animation_style=”slide” hover_enabled=”0″ z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

Elective Home Education

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.14.5″ vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ hover_enabled=”0″ z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

This guidance from the Department of Education from April 2019  describes elective home education as “a term used to describe a choice by parents to provide education for their children at home or in some other way they desire, instead of sending them to school full-time. This is different to education provided by a local authority other than at a school, for example for children who are too ill  to  attend  school”.

The recent case of Goodred v Portsmouth City Council [2021] Ms Cristina Goodred, after a successful crowd-funding campaign, challenged her local authority by way of Judicial Review as she considered they were interfering unnecessarily in the way she was educating her there children out of school and this was tantamount to bullying and indeed was nothing more than an attempt  force her to send her children to school despite what she was providing them was suitable. The Councils position was they were just complying with the most recent version of their policy “Elective Home Education” which was issued in 2020.

The difficulties started when the Portsmouth County Council wrote to Ms Goodred in July 2020 to review her children’s elective home education provision. She responded by providing a description of what the children had been doing but this was not seen to be sufficient, and more detail was asked for.  Ms Goodred responded by quoting paragraph 2.11 of the above guidance which states when electively home educating:

There are no legal requirements for you as parents educating a child at home to do any of the following: 

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.14.5″ vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ hover_enabled=”0″ z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” global_colors_info=”{}” sticky_enabled=”0″]

This did not satisfy the Council and Ms Goodred was served with a notice to satisfy (NTS) pursuant to 437(1) of the Education Act 1996 which places the burden of proof on parents to demonstrate that they are causing their child to receive a suitable education.

Ultimately the matter ended up before the High Court and Portsmouth successfully manage to defend its position. But what did The Hon. Mr Justice Lane say and how did he clarify the requirement on parents who choose to electively home educate?

Anyone who wants a comprehensive answer to the above question is encouraged to read the judgement, but it is important to be mindful that, when doing so, it relates to how Portsmouth’s policy related to Ms Goodred rather than the application of the policy generally.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version=”4.14.5″ vertical_offset_tablet=”0″ horizontal_offset_tablet=”0″ z_index_tablet=”0″ text_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” text_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” link_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” link_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ul_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ul_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” ol_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” ol_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” quote_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” quote_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_2_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_2_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_3_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_3_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_4_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_4_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_5_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_5_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” header_6_text_shadow_horizontal_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_vertical_length_tablet=”0px” header_6_text_shadow_blur_strength_tablet=”1px” box_shadow_horizontal_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_vertical_tablet=”0px” box_shadow_blur_tablet=”40px” box_shadow_spread_tablet=”0px” global_colors_info=”{}”]

In any event, perhaps the judgement provided the following clarification:

a) Parents do need to satisfy a local authority that they are providing suitable education. In respect of what must be provided, the Judge confirmed that there are no legal requirements to teach the National Curriculum, give formal lessons, mark work done by the child, formally assess the child’s progress or set development objectives.

b) The local authority must simply satisfy themselves that the education is suitable to the child’s age aptitude and ability.

c) There is no definition of a ‘suitable’ education in English statute law. A court will reach a view of suitability based on the individual circumstances of each child. The Department of Education’s guidance suggest that the term ‘suitable’ is assessed on the following grounds:

d) The local authority can request that the parent meet with them or provide copies of the child’s work. The parent is not obliged to do either of those things but must provide sufficient information to enable the local authority to be satisfied that the education provision is suitable.

e) A local authority must not be unreasonable when the seeking to assess whether the education under consideration is suitable.

f) A local authority must always explain any concerns it has so parents can respond in a meaningful way

g) Home educated children are not expected to work to school based standards.

Perhaps the above can be summarised by saying that elective home education is a big step which imposes the duty on the parent that their child must receive a suitable education. That said, when deciding whether this standard has been met, a local authority must not behave unreasonably.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.22″ fb_built=”1″ _i=”0″ _address=”0″][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row” _builder_version=”3.25″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” _i=”0″ _address=”0.0″][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.25″ custom_padding=”|||” _i=”0″ _address=”0.0.0″ custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.29.3″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat” hover_enabled=”0″ use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” _i=”0″ _address=”0.0.0.0″]

Last week I gave a talk in central London to an SEN recruitment agency about my journey and the struggles many specialist SEN schools have when recruiting specialist staff. 

The Headteacher of the school we set up 20 years ago for my son’s shared: 

‘There are lots of challenges, despite there being no official course for initial teacher training and autism (modules have been introduced). Teacher training still doesn’t adequately prepare most newly qualified teachers for SEN.

Our best teachers are former TA’s who have been trained by us for QTS thoroughly he schools direct program (1 year on the job and university training) whilst still employed by us. They have the the perspective of  a teaching assistant who are typically the backbone of schools like ours, this is the same in other ASD schools. We now have 14 out of 21 teachers who have started as TA’s (Teaching Assistants) are now qualified as teachers. They learn more with us than through study.

Brexit has been a problem, we do not get the same quality of candidates as previously. The really good E.U. candidates are no longer applying as once they did. We currently have some great Spanish and Greek staff who have been with us (16), over the past two years. I have not interviewed any E.U. candidates. This is reflected in national trends. Also pay being low, particularly for TA’s who probably work as hard as anyone and teaching assistants not being recognised as a profession which it should be, under the last labour government proposals were put forward to make it a profession by creating new standards but this would mean more adequate and increased pay scales, this was ditched by the conservative government about four to five years ago. 

Enticing people into SEN teaching by providing an experience route TA first then QTS reduces the challenge. It gives them on the job training by onsite therapy training and real life experience. With regards to getting therapists, providing them with top quality professional development seems to be more of a carrot than pay scales, as long as you align pay scales to NHS banding and can offer similar holidays to schools, we have had many therapists not accept due to pro rata pay when not offering school holidays, fortunately the therapists we have at the moment are very invested and have particular interest in ASD, more so than we have had in the past. Offering the opportunity of personal research also helps to continue their development.’

Anna Kennedy shared:

‘Many parents work hard in navigating a complicated SEN system some parents maxing out their credit cards in funding costly independent Speech and Language and Occupational Therapy reports in order to secure an appropriate school placement that can meet their son or daughters needs. They would hope after doing this and battling with the Local Authority with some parents going into tribunals, that schools have the trained teachers and therapists to provide the correct support and right space for learning for their children on the Autism spectrum’ 

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Skip to content